Compare And Contrast Essay Outline Ppt Slides

Presentation on theme: "Comparison and Contrast"— Presentation transcript:

1 Comparison and Contrast
A common assignment in all disciplines is to compare and contrast two or more things to discover how they are alike and/or how they are different. In U.S. History students might be asked to compare Jackson and Jefferson, in science students might compare and contrast the results of two similar labs, in music students might compare different pieces of music and their interpretation, in FTA students might compare elementary students to high school students etc. Besides its value in organizing an essay, comparison/contrast is also useful as a technique to structure a paragraph, to define a complex idea, to think about one thing in terms of another (vertebrates vs. invertebrates, World War I vs. World War II, etc., and to make an evaluation. Only similar items can be compared and/or contrasted. The comparison/contrast must be supported by examples.This Power Point will focus on two organizational patterns for this type of writing assignment, but as with all assignments, you should follow the directions as outlined by your instructor.

2 What is the Purpose?To show the similarities between at least two thingsand/orTo show the difference between two thingsTo informTo explainTo analyzeTo evaluateYou must have a purpose for writing the essay—why are you writing the essay? What is your point? When you are getting ready to buy a car you might have specific criteria to compare and contrast. (Teachers-Ask students to generate a list of things they might look for when buying a car.) The purpose of the comparison/contrast might be to get the best value for your dollar, to meet the needs of your budget, to plan for your future etc. As you plan for which college you may want to attend, you’ll compare and contrast specific criteria to make an informed decision.Writing a solid essay takes planning. Remember the Rhetorical Square. If you don’t have a clear idea of why you are comparing or contrasting two things, then you will have difficulty writing a focused paper.

3 Pre-writing- In the chart write the two items that you want to compare/contrast. Also include three features.ChartFeaturesThis type of graphic organizer works well to help you sort the data for your essay. The number of boxes will change depending on how many points of comparison/ contrast you will include in your paper. You can work with this grid to create the outline for your essay using one of the organizational patterns that will be discussed.

4 Venn DiagramAlikeMost of you have probably used a Venn Diagram in the past. With this graphic organizer, you use the overlapping circle to indicate how the items are alike and the outside circles to show how they are different. This method works best when there are only two subjects.

5 Thesis StatementWhile school conferences are very important to inform my parents of my struggles and successes in school, I prefer student led to teacher conferences. I used the following criteria to explain my rationale: focus, time to prepare, and length of conference.

6 Writing a Thesis Statement
Review your dataDecide to what extent you will stress the similarities between your subjects and to what extent you will stress their differencesCreate a thesis statement that reflects that decisionSome teachers may ask for a specific thesis pattern and others may allow you to have some freedom in developing your thesis. Also, your ideas may not be completely balanced between comparison and contrast; you may have more similarities than differences or vice versa.

7 Sample Thesis Statement for Honda/BMW Comparison/Contrast
In order to make a decision between the Honda Civic and the BMW, I used the following criteria: price of the vehicle, average mileage, and price of insurance.This statement lets the reader know the specific points of comparison/contrast and how the information will be used.

8 Paragraph Organization--Block
PriceMileageInsuranceBMW→→→80,000.00Less mileageHigh insuranceHondaCivic26,000.00Better mileageLower insurance2nd ParagraphFor the Block Method, your second paragraph would include all of the details from the top of the chart for the BMW, following by all of the details from the bottom of the chart for the Honda. Your conclusion would provide some type of final analysis or evaluation based on the evidence presented in the body paragraphs.3rd Paragraph

9 Paragraph Organization--BLOCK
PriceMileageInsuranceBMW2nd Paragraph3rd Paragraph4th ParagraphHondaCivic5th Paragraph6th Paragraph7th ParagraphYou may have too much information to put all of the details in one paragraph. This is another possibility for the BLOCK method.

10 Paragraph Organization--Point by Point
2nd Paragraph3rd Paragraph4th ParagraphPriceMileageInsuranceBMW↓HondaCivicFor the Point by Point Method, your second paragraph will include all of the details about the price of the car for both the BMW and the Honda Civic, your third paragraph will include the all the details about the mileage for both the BMW and the Honda Civic, the 4th paragraph will include the details about the insurance for both the BMW and the Honda Civic, and your conclusion will make some final analysis or evaluation about the cars based on the evidence provided in the body paragraphs.

11 Paragraph Organization—Point by Point
Price↓MileageInsuranceBMW2nd Paragraph4th Paragraph6th ParagraphHondaCivic3rd Paragraph5th Paragraph7th ParagraphAnother way of organizing the paragraphs for Point by Point.

12 Outline - Block Method I. Introduction a) Attention Getter or Hook
b) Background Informationc) ThesisII. BMWa) Priceb) Mileagec) InsuranceIII. Honda Civica) Priceb) Mileagec) InsuranceIV. Conclusiona) Emphasize Major Tiesb) So What?c) EvaluationThis method is also referred to as Subject by Subject or Whole to Whole. With this pattern (AB,AAA,BBB,AB A = Person or Place, Thing, Idea #1 and B = Person or Place, Thing, Idea # 2 ) you first discuss all of the details for one subject, in this case the BMW, and then all of the details for the second subject, the Honda Civic. The conclusion will reach some sort of final evaluation about the items you have chosen for your paper. If you were writing about cars, you might conclude your paper by making a selection based on the criteria. For example: Based on the excellent mileage, the low cost of insurance, and the price of the vehicle, the Honda Civic will definitely be my choice when I buy a new car.

13 Outline - Point by Point
IV. Insurancea) BMWb) HondaIV. Conclusiona) Emphasize Major Tiesb) So What?c) EvaluationI. Introductiona) Attention Getter or Hookb) Background Informationc) ThesisII. Pricea) BMWb) HondaIII. MileageIn this pattern AB, AB, AB, AB you provide details about both your subjects in each paragraph. You should follow the same order in each paragraph as well. For example if you begin by discussing the BMW each subsequent paragraph should begin with the details for the BMW. Another pattern, also known as Modified Block (AB, SSS, DDD, AB) introduces the two persons or things in the first paragraph, then focuses on their similarities in the second paragraph, then focus on their differences in the third paragraph, and finally returns to summarize the comparison and contrast. Choose a pattern that fits your topic and the length of the paper and stick with it.

14 Transitions To Contrast To Compare -although also as -but -even though
in the same waylikelikewisesimilarlycomparableequallyin additionTo Contrast-although-but-even though-however-on the other hand-otherwise-yet-still-conversely-as opposed to-different from-whereasThese transitions words will help to guide your reader through your comparisons and contrasts.

15 Review Make sure you understand the purpose of the assignment
Complete pre-writing activityGather evidenceCreate a thesis statementChoose an organizational patternWrite an outlineWrite a working draftRevise as neededAsk questions if you do not understand an assignment.Complete some type of pre-writing BEFORE you begin your first draft. If the strategies reviewed on the Power Point do not work for you, choose some other method that does.Gather enough supporting evidence to support your topic sentences. That evidence may be in the form of facts, statistics, examples, observations, quotations from literature etc..Write a thesis statement and keep it in front of you on a big sheet of paper as you write. This strategy will help you to avoid including unnecessary detail or bird walking.Write an outline. This does not have to be as formal as the samples given, but some sort of planning will help you to stay focused. As with all writing, you should continue to work through the writing process to prepare an essay for teacher evaluation. If you are not peer editing in class, ask another student or a parent to review the directions for the assignment and evaluate your draft.

16 Additional ResourcesSee East versus West for a sample essay and teacher comments.

Presentation on theme: "Comparison / Contrast Essay"— Presentation transcript:

1 Comparison / Contrast Essay

2 To compare means to point out similarities
To compare means to point out similarities. To contrast means to point out differences

3 A Comparison/contrast essay shows how things are alike or different to help the reader choose between alternatives.

4 Two things must be alike enough to result in a meaningful comparison
Two things must be alike enough to result in a meaningful comparison. Choose subjects that are similar enough to be compared or contrasted.

5 You need to find points of comparison that are parallel to show how the subjects are similar or different.

6 Will I compare or contrast?

7 Whether you decide to write about similarities or differences, you will have to decide how to organize your essay. You can choose between two patterns of organization:

8 Subject by Subject Say everything (your details) about your first subject and then you say everything about your second subject. The same points should be discussed for both subjects in the same order.

9 Subject by subject Outline I -Introduction: lead-in and thesis II- Body: Topic sentence Subject 1 point 1 point 2 point 3 Topic sentence Subject 2 point 1 point 2 point 3 III. Conclusion

10 Point by Point You support and explain your thesis statement by discussing each point of comparison or contrast, switching back and forth between subjects

11 Point by Point Outline I- Introduction: Lead-in and Thesis II- Body: Topic sentence point 1 subject 1 subject 2 Topic sentence point 2 subject 1 subject 2 Topic sentence point 3 subject 1 subject 2 III - Conclusion

12 Transitions One similarity Another similarity Similarly Like Both
As well asAlsoTooIn additionOne differenceAnother differenceIn contrastUnlikeAlthoughBut, yetInstead ofOn the other handWhereas

13 Don’t forget comparative of adjectives and adverbs: more … than less … than as … as the same …as

14 The thesis statement in the essay includes the two subjects you are comparing or contrasting and the main point you want to make about them.

15 Theses 1. “There are some interesting parallels between the Roman and the Chinese empires even though these empires ended differently.” 2. “People of the Jewish and Hindu faiths celebrate some festivals in a similar way.” 3.”Although neat people have a very nice environment, messy people are more relaxed.”

16 4. Soccer is more exciting, popular, and active than baseball.

17 Does my thesis statement explain what I am comparing or contrasting
Does my thesis statement explain what I am comparing or contrasting? Does it make a point about my topic?

18 “The first half of our lives is ruined by our parents, and the second half is ruined by our children.” “My grandfather once told me that there are two kinds of people: those who work and those who take the credit. He told me to try to be in the first group; there was less competition there.”

19 “People are more violently opposed to fur than leather because it is safer to harass rich women than motorcycle gangs.” “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”

20 Topics Compare or contrast 2 career options a movie and its sequel 2 classes in the EAP 2 teachers in the EAP Burger King/ Mc Donald renting a movie/ going to a movie Living together/ getting married children now/children fifty years ago

21 More Topics The person I am now versus the person I’d like to be in ten years. Vacations (living) with family and vacations (living) with friends. A holiday in your native country and the same holiday in the US

22 More topics: two jobs you have had children in your country/children in the US expectations about marriage/the reality of marriage Studying with a friend/studying alone. Leaving a child in day care/leaving a child with a family member

23 The end!

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